For a few years now, the Preparedness Community has been pointing to the economic issues of Venezuela and asking the public to take a good hard look at what is going on.  Our hearts go out to those who are suffering, and at the same time, our minds consider what we would do if we found ourselves in the same predicament.  One thing that we can definitely learn is how the people have adapted and found ways to continue living.  One major way that the people are surviving is through creating a barter economy.
GoSwap is a permanent house swapping site, meaning you list your house, look for a house you want, and then just swap away! Say you want to trade your beachfront home for a log cabin in the woods; maybe someone else on the site wants to swap their woodsy retreat for life at the beach. No more waiting to sell your place before buying your dream home, as you just have to find someone who wants what you have. Listing your home on the site costs anywhere between $9 and $270, but signing up and shopping around is free.

For one thing, the barter myth “makes it possible to imagine a world that is nothing more than a series of cold-blooded calculations,” writes Graeber in Debt. This view is quite common now, even when behavioral economists have made a convincing case that humans are much more complicated—and less rational—than classical economic models would suggest.


With 8.5 million members and 5,000 groups, Freecycle is like the mother of all garage sales, with one exception: Everything is free! The site started as a grassroots organization, encouraging members to reuse products rather than send them out to the landfills. For example, I have used Freecycle many times to find new owners for pieces of my cassette and record collection, piles of magazines and books, and assorted unneeded tools.

So as you consider items to stockpile, you should think about items that are necessary, but might not take up a lot of space.  Referring back to Mark Goodwin’s book mentioned above, one thing the main characters looked for were canning lids and rings.  They don’t take up a lot of space and in a real collapse situation, they will be really worth it!
And, if you’ve been in the Preparedness community for any amount of time, you are familiar with Fernando “Ferfal” Aguirre.  He wrote about his experiences of the economic collapse in Argentina in his very popular book,  The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse.  Argentina hasn’t really recovered from their collapse many years ago.  This video discusses one Barter Market Club that is located in an abandoned textile factory.
With 70,000 members posting items they would like to barter with or for, there is a good possibility you can find what you are looking for at U-Exchange. Listings are available from all over the world, and the search feature lets you narrow down your choices by keywords. There is no charge for membership or listings, as advertisers pay to sponsor the site.
“Economic theory has always got to be historically bounded,” Beggs says. “I think it’s a mistake to think you’ll find the workings of modern money by going back to the origins of money.” He does point out that, while barter may not have been widespread, it’s possible that it happened somewhere and led to money, just given how much is unknown about such a large period of time.
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