Since the 1830s, barter in some western market economies has been aided by exchanges which use alternative currencies based on the labour theory of value, and which are intended to prevent profit-taking by intermediaries. Examples include the Owenite socialists, the Cincinnati Time store, and more recently[when?] Ithaca HOURS (time banking) and the LETS system.
People in nearly 14,000 cities spread over 182 countries are waiting to rent you a room, apartment, or home wherever you’d like. Since 2008, Airbnb has made it easy for you to find a place to stay wherever you may be headed. Just enter the dates you need, see what’s available, and book your stay. The site even has its own payment system, protecting all parties from fraud and illegal activities. While you may at first only be interested in traveling, you can eventually sign up to be a host for other members. There are no fees to join, and Airbnb keeps a small portion of the host’s price of each stay to operate the business.

Especially prior to the Christmas holiday season, a gift and craft exchange can take the pinch out of your budget. Contact people within your network and arrange a day where people exchange homemade holiday decorations. You may not find everything you’re looking for, but you will likely find at least a few stocking stuffers – and the perfect price.


Check online swap markets and online auctions that have a bartering component such as Craigslist.com (check under "For Sale" for the Bartering category), Swapace.com, SwapThing.com, Barterquest.com, U-Exchange.com, Trashbank.com and Ourswaps.com. Check for local bartering clubs. Your local Chamber of Commerce may be able to provide you with information on similar clubs in your area.
So as you consider items to stockpile, you should think about items that are necessary, but might not take up a lot of space.  Referring back to Mark Goodwin’s book mentioned above, one thing the main characters looked for were canning lids and rings.  They don’t take up a lot of space and in a real collapse situation, they will be really worth it!

While the original idea for Rehash was to design clothing out of recycled clothes, it eventually evolved into a site for trading clothes with other users. Members can trade their unwanted stuff (clothing and accessories) with others who are looking for new items for their wardrobe, and vice-versa. Rehash also acts as a social community where users can get green living advice, read articles, request items, and attend swap events. Membership is free to interested parties.

Still, Adam Smith really did seem to believe barter was real. He writes, “When the division of labour first began to take place, this power of exchanging must frequently have been very much clogged and embarrassed in its operations,” and then goes on to describe the inefficiencies of barter. And Beggs says that many textbooks sloppily seem to endorse this viewpoint. “They sort of use that fairy tale,” he explains.
Bartering for goods and services is a centuries-old art. Recently, the idea of trading with your neighbors and within your community has received a big boost and taken on a modern spin. Combining our often-materialistic, ownership-based society with the Internet’s ability to bring buyers, sellers, and traders together, online bartering has sparked a wealth of new sites and communities.
Business-to-business barter often includes merchandise or services in exchange for advertising. A company may supply promotional items or a service for a TV, radio station or newspaper, and in return receive a set amount of airtime or a certain number of print ads. Other examples include trading advice for goods, or trading merchandise or services for stock.

PaperBack Swap is exactly what it sounds like: a place to swap paperback books. Currently, more than half a billion books are available for trade on the site. Just list the books you don’t want anymore and other members will find them. When someone requests one of your books, you just mail it out and then choose any available book that you want to receive. Swapping is easy, and membership is free.

You must include in gross income in the year of receipt the fair market value of goods or services received from bartering. Generally, you report this income on Form 1040, Schedule C.pdf, Profit or Loss from Business (Sole Proprietorship), or Form 1040, Schedule C-EZ.pdf, Net Profit from Business (Sole Proprietorship). If you failed to report this income, correct your return by filing a Form 1040X.pdf, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. Refer to Topic No. 308 and Should I File an Amended Return? for information on filing an amended return.
If you live in a major metropolitan area, chances are that you probably take public transportation to most of your destinations. You ditched your car long ago – eliminating parking, gas, and car insurance from your budget. But what if you need to get out of town for an hour-long meeting or pick up 25 bags of dirt from the landscaping store? Do you rent a car for the whole day even though you only need it for a few hours? Not if you have Zipcar nearby.

Are you self-employed and tired of only having your pets to talk to at home? Visiting a new city and need to find a space to hold a meeting with potential clients? If so, LiquidSpace can help. Using their iPhone or iPad app, members scan through available work or meeting space, book the space for specific times, and get directions and access to other services that the space provides. The company is debuting in the San Francisco Bay Area soon, and they hope to expand nationwide quickly.
Communities of Iroquois Native Americans, for instance, stockpiled their goods in longhouses. Female councils then allocated the goods, explains Graeber. Other indigenous communities relied on “gift economies,” which went something like this: If you were a baker who needed meat, you didn’t offer your bagels for the butcher’s steaks. Instead, you got your wife to hint to the butcher’s wife that you two were low on iron, and she’d say something like “Oh really? Have a hamburger, we’ve got plenty!” Down the line, the butcher might want a birthday cake, or help moving to a new apartment, and you’d help him out.

You must include in gross income in the year of receipt the fair market value of goods or services received from bartering. Generally, you report this income on Form 1040, Schedule C.pdf, Profit or Loss from Business (Sole Proprietorship), or Form 1040, Schedule C-EZ.pdf, Net Profit from Business (Sole Proprietorship). If you failed to report this income, correct your return by filing a Form 1040X.pdf, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. Refer to Topic No. 308 and Should I File an Amended Return? for information on filing an amended return.
Other anthropologists have questioned whether barter is typically between "total" strangers, a form of barter known as "silent trade". Silent trade, also called silent barter, dumb barter ("dumb" here used in its old meaning of "mute"), or depot trade, is a method by which traders who cannot speak each other's language can trade without talking. However, Benjamin Orlove has shown that while barter occurs through "silent trade" (between strangers), it also occurs in commercial markets as well. "Because barter is a difficult way of conducting trade, it will occur only where there are strong institutional constraints on the use of money or where the barter symbolically denotes a special social relationship and is used in well-defined conditions. To sum up, multipurpose money in markets is like lubrication for machines - necessary for the most efficient function, but not necessary for the existence of the market itself."[13]
Anthropologists have argued, in contrast, "that when something resembling barter does occur in stateless societies it is almost always between strangers."[6] Barter occurred between strangers, not fellow villagers, and hence cannot be used to naturalistically explain the origin of money without the state. Since most people engaged in trade knew each other, exchange was fostered through the extension of credit.[7][8] Marcel Mauss, author of 'The Gift', argued that the first economic contracts were to not act in one's economic self-interest, and that before money, exchange was fostered through the processes of reciprocity and redistribution, not barter.[9] Everyday exchange relations in such societies are characterized by generalized reciprocity, or a non-calculative familial "communism" where each takes according to their needs, and gives as they have.[10]
In Canada, barter continues to thrive. The largest b2b barter exchange is Tradebank, founded in 1987. P2P bartering has seen a renaissance in major Canadian cities through Bunz - built as a network of Facebook groups that went on to become a stand-alone bartering based app in January 2016. Within the first year, Bunz accumulated over 75,000 users[29] in over 200 cities worldwide.
Need a ride? Zimride is a ride share service which members use to set up private networks for sharing rides and saving money. Most cars fit four people, yet we usually commute by ourselves. Why not share the burden of car ownership and resource consumption? Centered around hundreds of colleges and universities, you can probably find a ride almost anywhere you need to go near campus.
While the original idea for Rehash was to design clothing out of recycled clothes, it eventually evolved into a site for trading clothes with other users. Members can trade their unwanted stuff (clothing and accessories) with others who are looking for new items for their wardrobe, and vice-versa. Rehash also acts as a social community where users can get green living advice, read articles, request items, and attend swap events. Membership is free to interested parties.
An alternate currency, denominated in labour time, would prevent profit taking by middlemen; all goods exchanged would be priced only in terms of the amount of labour that went into them as expressed in the maxim 'Cost the limit of price'. It became the basis of exchanges in London, and in America, where the idea was implemented at the New Harmony communal settlement by Josiah Warren in 1826, and in his Cincinnati 'Time store' in 1827. Warren ideas were adopted by other Owenites and currency reformers, even though the labour exchanges were relatively short lived.[20]
Barter, also known as counter-trade, is an accepted practice that makes trading more convenient for nations that have difficulty with currency conversion, as well as for nations with fewer financial resources but sufficient commodities. For example, if a country produces plenty of rice, that country may exchange it with another nation to acquire another type of grain, or fruits and vegetables. On the other hand, one country might trade foodstuffs for textiles or oil.
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It’s hard to answer that without actually seeing a modern gift economy in action. Luckily, modern gift economies actually do exist. On a small scale, they exist among friends, who might lend each other a vacuum or a cup of flour. There’s even an example of a gift economy on a much larger scale, albeit one that’s not always in operation: The Rainbow Gathering, an annual festival in which about 10,000 people gather for a month in the woods (it rotates among various national forests around the country each year) and agree not to bring any money. Groups of attendees set up “kitchens,” in which they prepare and serve food for thousands of people every day, all for free. Classical economists might guess that people would take advantage of such a system, but, sure enough, everyone is fed, and the people who don’t cook play music, set up trails, teach classes, gather firewood, and perform in plays, among other things.

In Spain (particularly the Catalonia region) there is a growing number of exchange markets.[24] These barter markets or swap meets work without money. Participants bring things they do not need and exchange them for the unwanted goods of another participant. Swapping among three parties often helps satisfy tastes when trying to get around the rule that money is not allowed.[25]
You must include in gross income in the year of receipt the fair market value of goods or services received from bartering. Generally, you report this income on Form 1040, Schedule C.pdf, Profit or Loss from Business (Sole Proprietorship), or Form 1040, Schedule C-EZ.pdf, Net Profit from Business (Sole Proprietorship). If you failed to report this income, correct your return by filing a Form 1040X.pdf, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. Refer to Topic No. 308 and Should I File an Amended Return? for information on filing an amended return.

But in real-world scenarios, like in Venezuela, Greece, and Argentina,  the fabric of society is still intact.  Society hasn’t unraveled like it did for Selco in Bosnia.  In those countries, people still go to work (if they have a job), go to school and life goes on, although it really sucks!  In these cases, bartering will be a little easier, safer and more readily available as society is intact.
In Spain (particularly the Catalonia region) there is a growing number of exchange markets.[24] These barter markets or swap meets work without money. Participants bring things they do not need and exchange them for the unwanted goods of another participant. Swapping among three parties often helps satisfy tastes when trying to get around the rule that money is not allowed.[25]
Can you teach a skill like canning or cooking from scratch?  Food staples will be more readily available than the processed food many are used to buying at the grocery store and fast food.  And although many in the preparedness community know how to can and cook from scratch, your common everyday American doesn’t.  They wouldn’t know what to do with flour, eggs, and a little oil. 

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Stop lugging around old books you won’t read again and trade them for some new reading material instead. Bookmooch uses a points system, so you’ll enter the books you want to give away, get requests from members who want your books, ship from home, get points, and then spend the points on the books you need. While membership is free, you’ll receive .10 points for every book you make available and 1 point for every book you successfully give away. To remain in good standing, you need to give away one book for every two you receive.
Like in Venezuela, people are bartering for needs.  The important things that are sought right now seem to be food and medicine.  But at some point, people will be wanting a “taste” of their former life.  They will want something that reminds them of the life they had.  It could be as simple as a piece of chocolate or a nice new dress.  The important thing here will be timing, security, and perception.
Some businesses that may not directly barter with customers may swap goods or services through membership-based trading exchanges such as ITEX or International Monetary Systems (IMS). By joining a trading network (which often charges fees), members can trade with other members for barter "dollars." Each transaction is subject to a minimal fee; the exchange facilitates the swap and manages the tax components of bartering such as issuing 1099-B forms to participating members. You may find a nearby exchange through the International Reciprocal Trade Association (IRTA) Membership Directory. Before you sign up and pay for a membership, however, make sure that members offer the types of goods and services you need. Otherwise, you may find yourself with barter money or credit that you cannot use.
Business to consumer barter may include things like free merchandise for a customer who is willing to provide sales leads. Person to person barter can include almost anything you can imagine. Auction sites are a good place to find others willing to trade for things you have. Classified ads, online or in print, are another handy way of conducting barter transactions, and so are barter clubs.
But in real-world scenarios, like in Venezuela, Greece, and Argentina,  the fabric of society is still intact.  Society hasn’t unraveled like it did for Selco in Bosnia.  In those countries, people still go to work (if they have a job), go to school and life goes on, although it really sucks!  In these cases, bartering will be a little easier, safer and more readily available as society is intact.
Barter-based economies are one of the earliest, predating monetary systems and even recorded history. People can successfully use barter in many almost any field. Informally, people often participate in barter and other reciprocal systems without really ever thinking about it as such -- for example, providing web design or tech support for a farmer or baker and receiving vegetables or baked goods in return. Strictly Internet-based exchanges are common as well, for example exchanging content creation for research.
An online community in which you can either share free stuff or rent items for a fee, NeighborhoodGoods bills itself as a “social inventory,” enabling members to save money and resources by borrowing what they need to use. While joining is free of charge, you can create private sharing groups for your business or neighborhood for a small fee: $36 for six months.
Like in Venezuela, people are bartering for needs.  The important things that are sought right now seem to be food and medicine.  But at some point, people will be wanting a “taste” of their former life.  They will want something that reminds them of the life they had.  It could be as simple as a piece of chocolate or a nice new dress.  The important thing here will be timing, security, and perception. 

Adam Smith, the father of modern economics, sought to demonstrate that markets (and economies) pre-existed the state, and hence should be free of government regulation[citation needed]. He argued (against conventional wisdom) that money was not the creation of governments. Markets emerged, in his view, out of the division of labour, by which individuals began to specialize in specific crafts and hence had to depend on others for subsistence goods. These goods were first exchanged by barter. Specialization depended on trade, but was hindered by the "double coincidence of wants" which barter requires, i.e., for the exchange to occur, each participant must want what the other has. To complete this hypothetical history, craftsmen would stockpile one particular good, be it salt or metal, that they thought no one would refuse. This is the origin of money according to Smith. Money, as a universally desired medium of exchange, allows each half of the transaction to be separated.[3]
@matthewc23 - I love being able to barter for things. You mentioned that you don't really have any specialized skills, but you would be surprised. Depending on your profession, think about any special training you have that a normal person wouldn't have. Some people would be willing to trade for that service. Even things you wouldn't normally think of as being services could be useful to someone else.
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